April 19, 2010

Beechcraft AT-6 Demonstrates Irregular Warfare Capabilities in Joint Expeditionary Force Experiment

WICHITA, Kan. (April 19, 2010) – Hawker Beechcraft Corporation (HBC) and team members Lockheed Martin, L3 WESCAM and CMC Esterline are demonstrating the capabilities of the Beechcraft AT-6 Light Attack and Armed Reconnaissance (LAAR) aircraft to the U.S. Air Force (USAF) in scenarios that showcase its support for irregular warfare operations. From April 12-23, HBC is conducting flights from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., as part of the Air Force’s Joint Expeditionary Force Experiment (JEFX). The JEFX objective is to take identified gaps in current combat capabilities and to demonstrate and assess possible innovations to fill those gaps. The involvement of the AT-6 in the exercise is sponsored by the Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve Command Test Center.

“The JEFX evaluations provide an outstanding opportunity for the AT-6 to demonstrate its versatility and performance and we’re confident it will do so in an impressive fashion,” said Jim Maslowski, president, U.S. and International Government Business. “The HBC team continues to respond to military mission requirements. We’re able to do so because we’re working with a platform that is extremely versatile and with partners who share the vision and resourcefulness to create a system that meets diverse mission needs.”

The AT-6 is a structurally strengthened derivative of the highly successful USAF and U.S. Navy (USN) T-6A/B trainer – the world’s most proven military trainer aircraft. HBC flew the AT-6 in its present avionics configuration after only nine months by working with leading defense companies to integrate the aircraft with advanced technologies.

Borrowing heavily from technologies it recently integrated into the Air Force’s A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft, Lockheed Martin integrated into the AT-6 a new mission computer controlled by A-10/F-16 based stick and throttle controls, an EO/IR sensor that serves as a targeting pod, data links to communicate with ground and airborne forces, anti-jam and secure communications radios, and full motion video transmission capability. The AT-6 also features fully integrated L3 WESCAM optical and infrared sensors, as well as sophisticated laser capabilities. The aircraft is equipped with the same CMC Esterline primary flight avionics and navigation system found in the USN T-6B and Moroccan T-6C.

Hawker Beechcraft Corporation is a world-leading manufacturer of business, special mission and trainer aircraft – designing, marketing and supporting aviation products and services for businesses, governments and individuals worldwide. The company’s headquarters and major facilities are located in Wichita, Kan., with operations in Salina, Kan.; Little Rock, Ark.; Chester, England, U.K.; and Chihuahua, Mexico. The company leads the industry with a global network of more than 100 factory-owned and authorized service centers. For more information, visit www.hawkerbeechcraft.com.

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